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Talk About “Trauma Therapy with Acupuncture: The NADA protocol on Healing Talk Radio Hosted by Diana Hoffman

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Diana Hoffman, founder of the Lightspring Counseling Center

Salem, UT – November 011 – Planetary Streams Talk Radio Network today announced that Diana Hoffman, Trauma Recovery Specialist, owner of Lightspring Counseling Center and host of “Healing Talk” radio show, will be joined by Nina Isaacson, Master of Oriental Medicine in a discussion of “Trauma therapy with Acupuncture: The NADA protocol”

The idea that poking someone with needles could relieve stress and trauma symptoms appears rather surprising to most of us, unless the fundamental principles behind this unusual PTSD treatment are understood.
Recent brain imaging and neuroscience research indicates that anxiety conditions and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder are created when fear-housing neurons in the deep brain link together and form neural networks. These networks become more and more extensive as traumatic experiences accumulate. As the networks grow, trauma responses are more easily triggered and are progressively more intense and painful.

These neural networks of fear and anxiety cannot be destroyed, but they can be neutralized if they are linked to neural networks of calming and soothing experiences, particularly calming sensations–as sensation is the primary “language” of the part of the deep brain that houses traumatic associations.

Acupuncture tends to produce feelings of deep relaxation and well-being–in part because many acupuncture points specifically trigger the release of endorphins. Thus acupuncture becomes a soothing experience and, when repeated can build a neural network that neutralizes traumatic associations.

Although this theory and insight about trauma treatment is very new, this approach to successfully trauma treatment with acupuncture has been going on for over thirty years. The most well-known and widely used technique for trauma is the technique advanced by the National Acupuncture detoxification Association (NADA).
The NADA protocol is a very efficient, inexpensive PTSD treatment that involves placing needles in five acupuncture points in the ears. The procure is quick, can be done in a chair, and the client can remain fully clothed.

The NADA protocol was first developed in the 1970s at Lincoln Hospital in New York City by Dr. Michael Smith. It was designed originally as a drug detoxification program. The protocol was based on the understanding that anxiety and PTSD treatment is fundamental to successful addiction treatment.

Research on Veterans using the NADA protocol demonstrates that the protocol reduces pain, decreases stress, improves sleep, reduces anxiety and irritability, and diminishes hypervigilance, flashbacks and nightmares.
Join us on Saturday November 12 as acupuncturist Nina Isaacson joins us to explore the research and applications of the NADA protocol for PTSD treatment on Healing Talk Radio. This program will stream at 9 am Mountain Time and will replay three times daily for a week on Planetary Streams Talk Radio, Web Campus World Wide Radio and Shoutcast.

About “Healing Talk” Talk Radio Show: The Healing Talk Radio Show explores the best of current research in emotional and relationship healing. Hosted by Diana Hoffman, Licensed Professional Counselor and Trauma Recovery Specialist in Salem, Utah. Listen every Saturday at 9 a.m. on Planetary Streams Talk Radio. Listen to internet replay daily at 9 am, 5 pm and 2 am Mountain Time on http://www.planetarystreams.com, http://www.wcww.com and http://www.shoutcast.com. Contact: healingtalkradio@gmail.com or visit the website, http://www.healingtalkradio.com.

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Talk About The Tragic Impact of Untreated PTSD in Veterans on “Healing Talk” Radio Hosted by Diana Hoffman This week’s Talk Radio Topic is The Tragic Impact of Untreated PTSD in Veterans

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Salem, UT – Planetary Streams Talk Radio Network today announced that Diana Hoffman, Trauma Recovery Specialist and host of “Healing Talk” radio show, will discuss “The Tragic Impact of Untreated PTSD in Veterans. According to Diana, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in veterans is a problem of enormous proportions.

The long lasting effects of ptsd in veterans are illustrated by the soldiers of the Vietnam war: According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, one third of the nation’s homeless population is comprised of Veterans, a majority of them Veterans from Vietnam. Tragically, the number of homeless Vietnam Veterans is now greater than the number of soldiers who were killed in Vietnam. They are homeless because of the dysfunction, addiction and mental illness caused by their war experience.

Various studies place the lifetime occurrence of PTSD in combat veterans at somewhere between 10 and 30 percent. It is estimated that 20 percent of military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan in the last 6 years have PTSD. That means over 300,000 soldiers are affected.

According to the Times Free Press, the Veterans Administration reports that about 1,000 veterans a month try to commit suicide.

A study published in JAMA show that Veterans with PTSD are more likely to abuse alcohol. They have an increase in health problems, and struggle more with anger and violent behavior. This violence is often directed towards family members.

Unfortunately, many Veterans do not want to admit, either to themselves or others that they are experiencing post-war trauma. Admitting there is a need for treatment has often been viewed by soldiers as a sign of weakness. This is an attitude that perpetuates a great deal of suffering. Untreated PTSD can often create a downward spiral of stress, addiction, damaged relationships, mental illness and physical deterioration.
It’s important to help our Veterans to understand that release techniques can be learned, painful emotions can be discharged safely and gradually, and soldiers can return to being normal civilians. Trauma therapy has been dramatically transformed in the last ten years by a wealth of brain imaging research and new techniques. It is now possible for many severe cases of PTSD in Veterans to be resolved, and for severely-impacted combat veterans to “get their lives back”.

About “Healing Talk” Talk Radio Show: The Healing Talk Radio Show explores the best of current research in emotional and relationship healing. Hosted by Diana Hoffman, Licensed Professional Counselor and Trauma Recovery Specialist in Salem,Utah. Listen every Saturday at 9 a.m. on Planetary Streams Talk Radio. Listen to internet replay daily at 9 am, 5 pm and 2 am Mountain Time on http://www.planetarystreams.com and http://www.wcww.com. Contact: healingtalkradio@gmail.com or visit the website, http://www.healingtalkradio.com.

Talk About Five Common Mistakes in Couple’s Communication on Healing Talk Radio Hosted by Diana Hoffman

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Planetary Streams Talk Radio Network today announced that Diana Hoffman, Trauma Recovery Specialist, owner of Lightspring Counseling Center and host of “Healing Talk” radio show, will discuss “Five Common Mistakes in Couple’s Communication. These common errors include:

Escalating a disagreement after partners have become upset creates damage to the relationship and has no benefits. When either partner has become angry or feels threatened or intimidated, the body’s arousal has changed, creating some level of flight, fight or freeze state. In any of these states, circulation to the brain is significantly reduced, particularly in the cerebral cortex. Reduced blood and reduced activity in the cerebral cortex means partners will be unlikely to really hear and understand each other, and will be unlikely to make fair-minded or thoughtful decisions. When the discussion becomes heated or emotional, good couple’s communication has come to an end.
If spouses will learn the skill of taking turns reflecting what is being said, neutrally and honestly, typically most of the energy in disagreements will subside, and spouses will be able to hear each other, compromise, or agree to disagree. If a conversation begins to heat up, spouses need to take a “time out” until they both are calm and can hear each other fairly.

Punishing a partner in an attempt to change their behavior is amazingly ineffective, and amazingly common. Punishment as a deterrent to bad behavior is marginally effective at best. Punishment as a motivation for good behavior is consistent failure. In a marriage, punishment is an abandonment of the equality of the partnership, and an attempt by one spouse to become the “parent” of the other. This always harms the relationship, as equality and respect are essential.

Spouses should handle each other’s problematic behaviors through negotiating, expressing feelings calmly and respectfully, explaining boundaries and taking essential actions. Spouses also need to accept their spouse as a unique individual, and recognize that marriage does not entitle them to “remodel” another person.
Rigid Thinking occurs when a partner assumes that his or her way of doing things is the only right way. Individuals grow up in a family culture that they usually assume represents a much larger culture. Thus it is a starting assumption that “my family was normal and average and correct in their way of doing things.” Although most individuals of marriage age have identified some things in their family culture that they want to change, there is typically a great deal more that they unconsciously accept and assume to be the “right way” to handle various aspects of married life.

Whenever there is a disagreement about how to handle a situation, spouses need to start with the assumption that their partner’s position has some validity behind it. Both partners need to listen carefully and understand their partner’s way of doing things, and work to find compromises, or else alternate between choosing “his way” and “her way” so that each partner’s preferences and family culture become part of the new marriage and effective couples communication.

Criticism is closely related to punishment. Both are based on the idea that an individual has the right to overhaul or remodel their partner. Although it is true that individuals will always have to make some changes to facilitate a marriage partnership, partners should be very respectful about requesting a change, and should focus a great deal more energy and time on noticing and admiring a partner’s strengths and qualities.

Expressing gratitude for any increments of change and improvement is a much more effective way of changing behavior than criticism or punishment. This approach also strengthens the relationship instead of weakening it.
Triangulating involves turning to a third party to try to resolve tensions between spouses. Common forms of triangulating in couples communication involve talking to a relative or family member to get them to influence the spouse in some way; sending messages through the children; punishing the children to demonstrate anger against the spouse; gossiping or broadcasting a spouse’s weaknesses to do others, or complaining to a marriage counselor to get him or her to “fix” the spouse.

Conflicts, frustrations and disagreements between the couple should be resolved by conversations between the couple. Children should be kept entirely out of parent’s conflicts. Unskilled third parties should also be avoided. A skilled third party such as a therapist may be helpful to act as a referee and teach advanced communication skills. However, spouses should talk to each other directly about their concerns, even in a counseling session, rather than communicating their frustrations indirectly by talking to their therapist in front of the spouse to make sure the partner hears, or by meeting alone with the therapist and trying to get the therapist to “fix” the spouse.

About “Healing Talk” Talk Radio Show: The Healing Talk Radio Show explores the best of current research in emotional and relationship healing. Hosted by Diana Hoffman, Licensed Professional Counselor and Trauma Recovery Specialist in Salem, Utah. Listen every Saturday at 9 a.m. on Planetary Streams Talk Radio. Listen to internet replay daily at 9 am, 5 pm and 2 am Mountain Time on http://www.planetarystreams.com, http://www.wcww.com and http://www.shoutcast.com. Contact: healingtalkradio@gmail.com or visit the website, http://www.healingtalkradio.com.