Tag Archives: healing talk radio

Nina Isaacson, Mother of Seventeen Adopted Children, Offers Her Insights on Mothering, Love, Resilience, and Never Giving Up.

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Nina Isaacson, Mother of Seventeen Adopted Children, Offers Her Insights on Mothering, Love, Resilience, and Never Giving Up.

Twelve years ago Scott and Nina Isaacson were featured on the Oprah Winfrey show for adopting seventeen children, many of whom were older and traumatized. Now, with not one failed adoption, Nina Isaacson shares insights on their journey as a family.

Salem, UT – February 17, 2012 – Nina Isaacson will be the featured guest on this week’s broadcast of Healing Talk Radio.

Twelve years ago Scott and Nina Isaacson were featured on the Oprah Winfrey show for adopting seventeen children, many of whom were older and had been abused and traumatized.

The Isaacsons, unable to have biological children, did not start out intending to adopt seventeen boys and girls. In the beginning they adopted a single newborn, and then another infant. In time they became acquainted with three sibling children who need to be together. The Isaacsons fostered these children and then adopted them. Gradually the number of adopted children swelled to 9, and the Isaacsons thought they were done.

Then they became aware of a family of eight children who were being separated in the foster care system because no one could be found who was willing to take on so many children at once. In an astonishing act of sacrifice and compassion, Scott and Nina chose to adopt them all and kept the children together.

The reaction of the community was mixed. Some, like Oprah, praised them for their heroism and compassion. Others thought they were naïve, or just crazy. A few predicted dire consequences.

Now, twelve years later, with not one failed adoption, with three sons on LDS missions simultaneously, four children still at home and thirteen grandchildren, Nina Isaacson will appear live on Healing Talk Radio to talk about her journey:
Join us as Nina shares what she did to create healing and stability for many of her children who had survived trauma and abuse; what she did to cope with the amazing level of stress and frequent crises of having seventeen children under fifteen years old; how she handling the logistics of so many meals, so many homework assignments, so many soccer games and so many personal needs, and hear her special message to parents of troubled children.

About “Healing Talk” Talk Radio Show: The Healing Talk Radio Show explores the best of current research in emotional and relationship healing. Host of the weekly “Healing Talk” Radio Show, Diana Hoffman is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Trauma Recovery Specialist at LightSpring Counseling in Salem, Utah. Healing Talk is broadcast live on KHQN 1480 AM every Friday at noon in Utah. The program is simulcast by video streaming to healingtalkradio.utahvalleylive.com. Healing Talk is syndicated to Planetary Streams Talk Radio, Web Campus World Wide Radio, and Shoutcast. Past programs are archived at healingtalkradio.com. Contact: healingtalkradio@gmail.com or visit the website, www.healingtalkradio.com.

Talk About The Tragic Impact of Untreated PTSD in Veterans on “Healing Talk” Radio Hosted by Diana Hoffman This week’s Talk Radio Topic is The Tragic Impact of Untreated PTSD in Veterans

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Salem, UT – Planetary Streams Talk Radio Network today announced that Diana Hoffman, Trauma Recovery Specialist and host of “Healing Talk” radio show, will discuss “The Tragic Impact of Untreated PTSD in Veterans. According to Diana, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in veterans is a problem of enormous proportions.

The long lasting effects of ptsd in veterans are illustrated by the soldiers of the Vietnam war: According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, one third of the nation’s homeless population is comprised of Veterans, a majority of them Veterans from Vietnam. Tragically, the number of homeless Vietnam Veterans is now greater than the number of soldiers who were killed in Vietnam. They are homeless because of the dysfunction, addiction and mental illness caused by their war experience.

Various studies place the lifetime occurrence of PTSD in combat veterans at somewhere between 10 and 30 percent. It is estimated that 20 percent of military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan in the last 6 years have PTSD. That means over 300,000 soldiers are affected.

According to the Times Free Press, the Veterans Administration reports that about 1,000 veterans a month try to commit suicide.

A study published in JAMA show that Veterans with PTSD are more likely to abuse alcohol. They have an increase in health problems, and struggle more with anger and violent behavior. This violence is often directed towards family members.

Unfortunately, many Veterans do not want to admit, either to themselves or others that they are experiencing post-war trauma. Admitting there is a need for treatment has often been viewed by soldiers as a sign of weakness. This is an attitude that perpetuates a great deal of suffering. Untreated PTSD can often create a downward spiral of stress, addiction, damaged relationships, mental illness and physical deterioration.
It’s important to help our Veterans to understand that release techniques can be learned, painful emotions can be discharged safely and gradually, and soldiers can return to being normal civilians. Trauma therapy has been dramatically transformed in the last ten years by a wealth of brain imaging research and new techniques. It is now possible for many severe cases of PTSD in Veterans to be resolved, and for severely-impacted combat veterans to “get their lives back”.

About “Healing Talk” Talk Radio Show: The Healing Talk Radio Show explores the best of current research in emotional and relationship healing. Hosted by Diana Hoffman, Licensed Professional Counselor and Trauma Recovery Specialist in Salem,Utah. Listen every Saturday at 9 a.m. on Planetary Streams Talk Radio. Listen to internet replay daily at 9 am, 5 pm and 2 am Mountain Time on http://www.planetarystreams.com and http://www.wcww.com. Contact: healingtalkradio@gmail.com or visit the website, http://www.healingtalkradio.com.

Talk About Five Common Mistakes in Couple’s Communication on Healing Talk Radio Hosted by Diana Hoffman

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Planetary Streams Talk Radio Network today announced that Diana Hoffman, Trauma Recovery Specialist, owner of Lightspring Counseling Center and host of “Healing Talk” radio show, will discuss “Five Common Mistakes in Couple’s Communication. These common errors include:

Escalating a disagreement after partners have become upset creates damage to the relationship and has no benefits. When either partner has become angry or feels threatened or intimidated, the body’s arousal has changed, creating some level of flight, fight or freeze state. In any of these states, circulation to the brain is significantly reduced, particularly in the cerebral cortex. Reduced blood and reduced activity in the cerebral cortex means partners will be unlikely to really hear and understand each other, and will be unlikely to make fair-minded or thoughtful decisions. When the discussion becomes heated or emotional, good couple’s communication has come to an end.
If spouses will learn the skill of taking turns reflecting what is being said, neutrally and honestly, typically most of the energy in disagreements will subside, and spouses will be able to hear each other, compromise, or agree to disagree. If a conversation begins to heat up, spouses need to take a “time out” until they both are calm and can hear each other fairly.

Punishing a partner in an attempt to change their behavior is amazingly ineffective, and amazingly common. Punishment as a deterrent to bad behavior is marginally effective at best. Punishment as a motivation for good behavior is consistent failure. In a marriage, punishment is an abandonment of the equality of the partnership, and an attempt by one spouse to become the “parent” of the other. This always harms the relationship, as equality and respect are essential.

Spouses should handle each other’s problematic behaviors through negotiating, expressing feelings calmly and respectfully, explaining boundaries and taking essential actions. Spouses also need to accept their spouse as a unique individual, and recognize that marriage does not entitle them to “remodel” another person.
Rigid Thinking occurs when a partner assumes that his or her way of doing things is the only right way. Individuals grow up in a family culture that they usually assume represents a much larger culture. Thus it is a starting assumption that “my family was normal and average and correct in their way of doing things.” Although most individuals of marriage age have identified some things in their family culture that they want to change, there is typically a great deal more that they unconsciously accept and assume to be the “right way” to handle various aspects of married life.

Whenever there is a disagreement about how to handle a situation, spouses need to start with the assumption that their partner’s position has some validity behind it. Both partners need to listen carefully and understand their partner’s way of doing things, and work to find compromises, or else alternate between choosing “his way” and “her way” so that each partner’s preferences and family culture become part of the new marriage and effective couples communication.

Criticism is closely related to punishment. Both are based on the idea that an individual has the right to overhaul or remodel their partner. Although it is true that individuals will always have to make some changes to facilitate a marriage partnership, partners should be very respectful about requesting a change, and should focus a great deal more energy and time on noticing and admiring a partner’s strengths and qualities.

Expressing gratitude for any increments of change and improvement is a much more effective way of changing behavior than criticism or punishment. This approach also strengthens the relationship instead of weakening it.
Triangulating involves turning to a third party to try to resolve tensions between spouses. Common forms of triangulating in couples communication involve talking to a relative or family member to get them to influence the spouse in some way; sending messages through the children; punishing the children to demonstrate anger against the spouse; gossiping or broadcasting a spouse’s weaknesses to do others, or complaining to a marriage counselor to get him or her to “fix” the spouse.

Conflicts, frustrations and disagreements between the couple should be resolved by conversations between the couple. Children should be kept entirely out of parent’s conflicts. Unskilled third parties should also be avoided. A skilled third party such as a therapist may be helpful to act as a referee and teach advanced communication skills. However, spouses should talk to each other directly about their concerns, even in a counseling session, rather than communicating their frustrations indirectly by talking to their therapist in front of the spouse to make sure the partner hears, or by meeting alone with the therapist and trying to get the therapist to “fix” the spouse.

About “Healing Talk” Talk Radio Show: The Healing Talk Radio Show explores the best of current research in emotional and relationship healing. Hosted by Diana Hoffman, Licensed Professional Counselor and Trauma Recovery Specialist in Salem, Utah. Listen every Saturday at 9 a.m. on Planetary Streams Talk Radio. Listen to internet replay daily at 9 am, 5 pm and 2 am Mountain Time on http://www.planetarystreams.com, http://www.wcww.com and http://www.shoutcast.com. Contact: healingtalkradio@gmail.com or visit the website, http://www.healingtalkradio.com.

Talk About Common Myths About Letting Go of the Past on Healing Talk radio show.

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Talk About “Common Myths About Letting Go of the Past” on “Healing Talk” radio show. This week’s Talk Radio Topic is “ Common Myths About letting Go of the Past.”

Salem, UT – Aug, 25, 2011 According to Diana Hoffman, Licensed Professional Counselor, Trauma Specialist and Clinical Hypnotherapist, brain imaging research and neuroscience in the last decade have opened up a great deal of information about how emotions are stored in the brain, and how they can most effectively be resolved. Even so, a number of prevalent myths continue to shape our attitudes about resolving emotional pain.

Myth # 1. The way to let go of the past is to talk it to death. Putting feelings into words doesn’t access the language of the deep brain, and can bringing up the pain of the past over and over without producing the needed feelings of resolution and safety.

Muth #2. The best way to release anger is to vent and get it all out (anger catharsis). Every reliable outcome study to date shows anger catharsis makes people feel and act worse True emotional release usually leads to discovering what is beneath the anger, and involves dissolving the anger as well as resolving the underlying emotions.

Myth #3. Changing attitudes and beliefs about painful events is the best way to change painful feelings. This approach sometimes helps with guilt, shame and identity issues, but with trauma emotions it tends to puts the cart before the horse. The parts of the deep brain that store traumatic emotions do not respond to words or logical reasoning. However, when the deep brain emotions are released using appropriate techniques, consciously-held attitudes and beliefs often change spontaneously as a result.

Myth #4. If I just keep my focus on the present, the past will go away. Research show the past doesn’t go away. Trying harder and harder not to think about it or feel it produces a host of “distraction behaviors” such as overworking, addictions, thrill-seeking, or trying to overwhelm the conscious mind with constant noise from radio, television and computer activities. Yet in spite of all these distractions, the unresolved traumas from the past persist, frequently producing substance abuse, depression and health problems even fifty years after the events occurred.

Myth #5. Repressed events must be remembered to be released. This belief has been the foundation of a lot of “age regression” therapy, which is often unnecessarily traumatic. Now it is known that emotional pain can be effectively released without ever knowing what caused it. Repressed pain can be accessed through affect bridging or by identifying a somatic expression of an emotion–and can be permanently and completely resolved without recovering memory.

Myth #6. Traumatic events don’t matter if I was too young to remember them. Trauma events in infancy and early childhood are particularly damaging because an infant has so few coping mechanisms to handle pain and stress. Emotional trauma from infancy can persist throughout adult life, causing depression, anxiety and other problems without a consciously-remembered cause.

Myth #7. Emotional release has to involve crying or a lot of intense emotion. Good emotional releases should be paced to unfold gradually and manageably, and should be grounded in enough emotional safety to proceed with relative little distress. The completion of a release requires that pain be replaced with a deep sense of peace and safety.

Myth #8. If I cried about an event, then I must have released it. Many individuals without training or support in release work will cry, but never reach the needed level of safety and resolution. Thus the pain remains, even though crying episodes related to a traumatic experience may happen over and over again.

About “Healing Talk” Radio Show: The “Healing Talk” Radio Show explores the best of current research and resources for healing mind, body and relationships. Hosted by Diana Hoffman, Licensed Professional Counselor, Trauma Specialist, and owner of Salem Counseling Center in Salem, Utah. Listen LIVE every Wednesday at 5 p.m. Mountain Time on Planetary Streams Talk Radio. Listen to internet replay repeating daily at 11 am , 2 am and 5 pm MT for a week following the live show on http://www.planetarystreams.com and http://www.wcww.com. Contact: healingtalkradio@gmail.com. or visit the radio blogsite, http://healingtalkradio.wordpress.com